"There is nothing noble in being superior to your fellow man; true nobility is being superior to your former self."
                -- Ernest Hemingway

Author Topic: A Knight and Love  (Read 5303 times)

Sir William

  • Cogito ergo sum
  • Knight of the Order
  • Forum Veteran
  • ****
  • Posts: 7,154
Re: A Knight and Love
« Reply #15 on: 2014-02-21, 14:02:57 »
Makes me think of Ironclad. He was still chivalrous towards the lady but he didn't want any sexual relations.
In the end love and chivalry is just a misconception then isn't it?

But he does succumb to her advances before the final battle; that's Hollywood for you (I found that scene unnecessary) right?

In any event, I do not see them as mutually exclusive; hopefully should you ever fall in love, you'll be the very paradigm of courtly chivalry to your lady!  I also view chivalry as a means of, maybe not loving your fellow man, but being concerned for your fellow man- in some ways, responsible for them.  As modern era knights, we are not tasked with charging enemy lines or experiencing the joys (and horrors) of the sort of combat that is romanticized by books, movies and, in no small way, people with similar interests as ours. 

I do it because it is something that has been a part of me since I was a kid but I realize that our part is to instill the desire to explore this period in time, and educate and encourage those who would pursue it, whether purely on a scholarly level or as with most of us, inclusion of a more energetic route.  Seeing young men like yourself and your brother hold such an interest in knightly pursuits is edifying (not all kids are rotten lol) and I hope you two stay on the Path.
The Black Knight, Order of the Marshal
'Per Pale Azure and Sable, a Chevron counterchanged fimbriated argent.' 
“Pride makes a man, it drives him, it is the shield wall around his reputation.  Men die, but reputation does not.”

Aiden of Oreland

  • Squire of the Order
  • Forum Acolyte
  • ***
  • Posts: 926
  • Let faith be my shield and let joy be my steed
Re: A Knight and Love
« Reply #16 on: 2014-02-22, 05:16:12 »
Makes me think of Ironclad. He was still chivalrous towards the lady but he didn't want any sexual relations.
In the end love and chivalry is just a misconception then isn't it?

But he does succumb to her advances before the final battle; that's Hollywood for you (I found that scene unnecessary) right?

In any event, I do not see them as mutually exclusive; hopefully should you ever fall in love, you'll be the very paradigm of courtly chivalry to your lady!  I also view chivalry as a means of, maybe not loving your fellow man, but being concerned for your fellow man- in some ways, responsible for them.  As modern era knights, we are not tasked with charging enemy lines or experiencing the joys (and horrors) of the sort of combat that is romanticized by books, movies and, in no small way, people with similar interests as ours. 

I do it because it is something that has been a part of me since I was a kid but I realize that our part is to instill the desire to explore this period in time, and educate and encourage those who would pursue it, whether purely on a scholarly level or as with most of us, inclusion of a more energetic route.  Seeing young men like yourself and your brother hold such an interest in knightly pursuits is edifying (not all kids are rotten lol) and I hope you two stay on the Path.


There were reasons these stories were told to youth, this subject reminds me of William Faulkner's Acceptance Speech. It spoke about how stories of today have lost a certain element. Moral. That people today write about physical fears and write "not from the heart, but from the gland"(Faulkner, Acceptance Speech).

Im sorry but when he puts on the armor and rides out to meet his enemy was really awesome... Until his horse had to drag his sorry butt into the castle lol. As you said Sir William, this is something that we grew up with. This path me and my brother chosen almost calls to us. Hopefully I will be able to start a school club in my school to truly educate people about these things. Who knows, maybe it will make high school drama in my school more romantic and chivalrous hahaha. As young as we are, I find it sad when I sit in my english class and not a single person(besides me) knows what a damsel is! A damsel!!! I was actually upset. I tell you there is something lacking now and days in todays youth. "Thou saucy fellows". Ever think about Gandalf's quote about how what you read about isn't in your books, its out there. I do all the time. Every time I read a book.
-"I raise not the sword, but the shield."-Aiden Max

Sir Robert

  • Sir Robert
  • Knight of the Order
  • Forum Follower
  • ****
  • Posts: 154
  • A leasanna a chosaint agus
Re: A Knight and Love
« Reply #17 on: 2014-03-21, 04:40:41 »
I'm not sure I even want to register on this, but while perhaps a lady to pine over may be a good bonus, knights are overly romanticized, indeed while most professed a devotion to god, and perhaps some were "perfect" knights, there were more that we're not. So no lady required, many served perhaps, but not a requirement to be a knight, perhaps a good virtue but these were men, and let's say that modern ideals today did not apply....

Aiden of Oreland

  • Squire of the Order
  • Forum Acolyte
  • ***
  • Posts: 926
  • Let faith be my shield and let joy be my steed
Re: A Knight and Love
« Reply #18 on: 2014-03-21, 19:16:34 »
I'm not sure I even want to register on this, but while perhaps a lady to pine over may be a good bonus, knights are overly romanticized, indeed while most professed a devotion to god, and perhaps some were "perfect" knights, there were more that we're not. So no lady required, many served perhaps, but not a requirement to be a knight, perhaps a good virtue but these were men, and let's say that modern ideals today did not apply....

Maybe not a requirement to be a knight, but expected as a person of that time. Around my age even correct?
-"I raise not the sword, but the shield."-Aiden Max