"No person was ever honored for what he received. Honor has been the reward for what he gave."
                -- Calvin Coolidge

Author Topic: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?  (Read 25124 times)

Sir William

  • Cogito ergo sum
  • Knight of the Order
  • Forum Veteran
  • ****
  • Posts: 7,154
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #15 on: 2015-01-15, 21:25:02 »
That was very cool; my daughter took Latin in school and I meant to learn it so we could converse but I never got around to it.  Beautiful language...and I like that it doesn't use all of the qualifiers we use now (the, and, of, etc).

The Black Knight, Order of the Marshal
'Per Pale Azure and Sable, a Chevron counterchanged fimbriated argent.' 
“Pride makes a man, it drives him, it is the shield wall around his reputation.  Men die, but reputation does not.”

Lord Dane

  • The Hound, Hunter, and Hammer of Justice
  • Knight of the Order
  • Forum Acolyte
  • ****
  • Posts: 1,900
  • Selflessness, Service, Justice.
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #16 on: 2015-01-15, 22:38:46 »
I guess I know who wants to be the Order scribe. LOL
"Fides, Honos, Prudentia, Sapiencia" (Faith, Honor, Prudence, Wisdom)
"Fiat justitia ruat caelum" (Let justice be done)

Sir Rodney

  • Knight of the Order
  • Forum Acolyte
  • ****
  • Posts: 1,118
  • Inquit Corvus
    • The Mercenary Company Nevermore
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #17 on: 2015-01-16, 03:27:12 »
Nicely done!   8)

I’m curious; does the Latin "nervus" have any relation to the English "nervous"?  If so, I’ll never be nervous again!   :D
"Oh, what sad times are these when passing ruffians can say Ni at will to old ladies. There is a pestilence upon this land, nothing is sacred. Even those who arrange and design shrubberies are under considerable economic stress in this period in history." - Roger the Shrubber

Mike W.

  • Squire of the Order
  • Forum Acolyte
  • ***
  • Posts: 541
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #18 on: 2015-01-16, 20:53:12 »
Yes as a matter of fact.

Nervus is a word with multiple meanings (as many words in Latin are). First and foremost, it means muscle, sinew, nerve, tendon i.e. the stuff under your skin. The English word nervous originally meant "affecting the nerves, muscle, sinew, etc."
D’azur à trois fasces d’argent, et au chef gueule chargé de trois étoiles d’or.

"The first duty of a man is the seeking after and the investigation of truth." - Marcus Tullius Cicero

Aiden of Oreland

  • Squire of the Order
  • Forum Acolyte
  • ***
  • Posts: 926
  • Let faith be my shield and let joy be my steed
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #19 on: 2015-01-17, 06:01:00 »
Yes as a matter of fact.

Nervus is a word with multiple meanings (as many words in Latin are). First and foremost, it means muscle, sinew, nerve, tendon i.e. the stuff under your skin. The English word nervous originally meant "affecting the nerves, muscle, sinew, etc."

I really hope you are striving to become a teacher someday because WOW you are a bank of knowledge my friend.
-"I raise not the sword, but the shield."-Aiden Max

Sir Nate

  • Nathan
  • Yeoman of the Order
  • Forum Acolyte
  • **
  • Posts: 1,702
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #20 on: 2015-01-20, 22:37:43 »
Thank you Baron
Nathan Phillip Max
Knight of the Order
"Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I shall fear no evil"

SirNathanQ

  • Knight of the Order
  • Forum Acolyte
  • ****
  • Posts: 1,742
  • "Nobiscum Deus" "Libertas ad omnes civitates"
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #21 on: 2015-02-01, 17:01:09 »
Hey Mike, while the offer for epic poems stands, could you real quick give me a translation of the Aeneid, with grammatical forms, lexical definitions and structure commentary? Would be a big help for Latin 104!  ;)
I'm a student of Latin (on my fourth class) and I can verify, Mike's translations are spot on.
Great translation, man. I'm glad to see I might have some use for my Latin courses outside of my comps.
"The maximum use of force is in no way incompatible with the simultaneous use of the intellect." -Carl Von Clausewitz
"He is truly a fearless knight and secure on every side, for his soul is protected by the armor of faith just as his body is protected by armor of steel." -Saint Bernard of Clairvoux

Mike W.

  • Squire of the Order
  • Forum Acolyte
  • ***
  • Posts: 541
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #22 on: 2015-02-02, 15:30:09 »
I translated the first two books of the Aenied in my Latin poetry class. That was mind numbing. Latin's got all these rules and exceptions to those rules, just like English. But when you turn it into poetry, nothing makes sense. Virgil had a way of screwing up absolutely everything. He is every Latin student's worst nightmare. But I would be more than happy to help if you need it.

And no, there is no use for Latin, outside of turning you into a grammer Nazi.
D’azur à trois fasces d’argent, et au chef gueule chargé de trois étoiles d’or.

"The first duty of a man is the seeking after and the investigation of truth." - Marcus Tullius Cicero

Sir James A

  • Weapons & Armor addict
  • Knight of the Order
  • Forum Veteran
  • ****
  • Posts: 6,043
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #23 on: 2015-02-02, 18:29:27 »
I translated the first two books of the Aenied in my Latin poetry class. That was mind numbing. Latin's got all these rules and exceptions to those rules, just like English. But when you turn it into poetry, nothing makes sense. Virgil had a way of screwing up absolutely everything. He is every Latin student's worst nightmare. But I would be more than happy to help if you need it.

And no, there is no use for Latin, outside of turning you into a grammer Nazi.

* Grammar

;)
Knight, Order of the Marshal
Sable, a chevron between three lions statant Argent

Mike W.

  • Squire of the Order
  • Forum Acolyte
  • ***
  • Posts: 541
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #24 on: 2015-02-02, 19:12:41 »
I didn't say spelling Nazi!
D’azur à trois fasces d’argent, et au chef gueule chargé de trois étoiles d’or.

"The first duty of a man is the seeking after and the investigation of truth." - Marcus Tullius Cicero

Sir Nate

  • Nathan
  • Yeoman of the Order
  • Forum Acolyte
  • **
  • Posts: 1,702
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #25 on: 2015-02-06, 21:21:27 »
I didn't say spelling Nazi!
*I didn't say spelling nazi
Nathan Phillip Max
Knight of the Order
"Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I shall fear no evil"

Ian

  • Knight of the Order
  • Forum Veteran
  • ****
  • Posts: 2,994
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #26 on: 2015-02-06, 21:46:11 »
I didn't say spelling Nazi!
*I didn't say spelling nazi

Nazi as a proper noun should be capitalized.  :)
« Last Edit: 2015-02-06, 21:49:47 by Ian »
My YouTube Channel - Knyght Errant
My Pinterest

Qui desiderat pacem, praeparet bellum

Sir Nate

  • Nathan
  • Yeoman of the Order
  • Forum Acolyte
  • **
  • Posts: 1,702
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #27 on: 2015-02-06, 22:06:26 »
I didn't say spelling Nazi!
*I didn't say spelling nazi

Nazi as a proper noun should be capitalized.  :)

:O
Nathan Phillip Max
Knight of the Order
"Though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I shall fear no evil"

Mike W.

  • Squire of the Order
  • Forum Acolyte
  • ***
  • Posts: 541
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #28 on: 2015-02-07, 03:12:07 »
Umm... You have heard of Nazi Germany, right? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nazi_Germany
D’azur à trois fasces d’argent, et au chef gueule chargé de trois étoiles d’or.

"The first duty of a man is the seeking after and the investigation of truth." - Marcus Tullius Cicero

Sir Douglas

  • Artificer of Stuff and Things
  • Knight of the Order
  • Forum Acolyte
  • ****
  • Posts: 815
  • In principio creavit Deus caelum et terram.
Re: "Order of the Marshal" in Latin?
« Reply #29 on: 2015-02-07, 03:41:41 »
We've almost got a Godwin's Law thing happening here. Exciting! ;)
Per pale azure and argent, an eagle displayed per pale argent and sable, armed and langued or.

So a Norman, a Saxon, and a Viking walk into England....