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Main => The Campaign => Topic started by: Sir Douglas on 2015-07-17, 03:04:55

Title: PARF 2015
Post by: Sir Douglas on 2015-07-17, 03:04:55
If anyone's planning on hitting the PA RenFaire this year, here's the place to discuss possible meetups.

On my end, I have two weekends reserved in August: the 1st-2nd and the 8th-9th, but I'll only be able to do one. So if anyone's planning on either of those weekends, let me know which one. :) A second weekend in September is possible, funds permitting.
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Naythan on 2015-07-20, 14:29:11
if we want to do a meet up with others, september could be better, since its farther away giving people more time to plan.
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Aiden of Oreland on 2015-07-22, 19:49:04
Which Faire? The West one or the East one?
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Sir Douglas on 2015-07-24, 02:33:25
East one. That one's PARF. The one out here [west] is called the Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival and does not have a snappy acronym. ;)
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Lord Dane on 2015-07-24, 12:44:57
Aug 15, 16 we be there :)
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Naythan on 2015-09-24, 12:35:02
I will be There the 10th of October. Unless something happens.
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Naythan on 2015-10-05, 21:33:49
Is anyone else heading up this weekend?
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Sir William on 2015-10-07, 14:35:50
Sir Douglas...where are those pics?  ;)
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Lord Dane on 2015-10-08, 00:25:56
Planning on PARF last day Oct 25 with gf. Anyone else??
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Sir James A on 2015-10-08, 23:10:39
Planning on PARF last day Oct 25 with gf. Anyone else??

Closing day for MDRF ;)
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Sir Douglas on 2015-10-17, 18:18:17
Sir Douglas...where are those pics?  ;)

You know, I have been completely lazy with pics this year. But here are....two! :P I think this was from the opening week of PARF.
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Sir James A on 2015-10-17, 23:29:43
Looks awesome! I like the painted helmet too.
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Sir Edward on 2015-10-19, 14:29:12

Man, nice pictures! Your kit is looking fantastic. I love the Ailettes, BTW. I've been planning on re-doing mine and make them large like that, as often seen in the manuscript imagery.
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Naythan on 2015-10-22, 02:15:30

Great kit Doug!




Man, nice pictures! Your kit is looking fantastic. I love the Ailettes, BTW. I've been planning on re-doing mine and make them large like that, as often seen in the manuscript imagery.

I have noticed your Ailettes to seem to be a bit on the small side. Maybe I could commission my friend Sam Petterson to make you a pair. Besides your birthday is what, January?
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Thorsteinn on 2015-10-29, 21:48:50
Isn't their some dispute as to what ailettes were used for?
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Lord Dane on 2015-10-29, 21:50:17
Isn't their some dispute as to what ailettes were used for?

Heraldric decoration makes more sense as they offered little in ways of protection both from material and coverage.
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Sir Edward on 2015-10-29, 21:55:47

Yeah, it's not 100% clear how much they were used as heraldic decoration, versus additional protection. Since we don't have any surviving examples, and only see them depicted in artwork, it's hard to tell. It's probably a combination of both, but in what proportion is anyone's guess.
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Ian on 2015-10-29, 22:09:09
Blair in European Armor states this on ailettes (and no it doesn't give a translation of that 14th century French bit at the end unfortunately):

"It used to be thought that their purpose was to protect the head and neck against cuts from the side, but this view can no longer be accepted.  The many references to ailettes found in early 14th-century texts show quite clearly that they were invariably made of flimsy material quite unsuited for any defensive purpose.  It is now generally held that their chief role was heraldic, but they seem on occasions, to have been purely ornamental.  This view i supported, to quote one example only, but the following entry in the inventory of effects of Piers Gaveston, dated 1313:  Item, autres diver garnementz des armes le dit Pierres, ovek les alettes garniz et frettez de perles."
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Sir Edward on 2015-10-29, 23:17:18

Huh, cool. Does he say what the flimsy materials are, or give any documentation of their construction? And what sources are indicating this? I'm just curious, since it'll help me in making my own (plus it's helpful to back it up in future conversations).
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Ian on 2015-10-29, 23:43:53
Blair doesn't spend much more time on them, but there is an account from a late 13th century tournament at Windsor that describes them as being made from parchment.  In the medieval context this would be a fine leather more than paper-like in consistency, and this is specific to a tournament so it's unclear if it is appropriate to *all* ailettes.  There are no known extant ailettes.  It's one of those mystery things.  Most people seem to like the idea of making them from a thin piece of hardened leather or maybe parchment stretched over thin wood.  Some people are really attached to the idea of them being defensive.  Some evidence points to them being made of non-defensive materials.  Most of the people who say they are defensive point to the fact that they are depicted artistically in battle, but so are things like heraldic crests and surcoats, so it would appear knights were willing to wear flashy heraldic symbols that weren't directly for defense.  It is a mystery ;)

*edit, corrected typo Late 12th should have been Late 13th*
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Thorsteinn on 2015-10-30, 02:10:05
Maybe they wee defensive in the cover v. concealment sense?
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Naythan on 2015-10-30, 12:26:10
Blair doesn't spend much more time on them, but there is an account from a late 12th century tournament at Windsor that describes them as being made from parchment.  In the medieval context this would be a fine leather more than paper-like in consistency, and this is specific to a tournament so it's unclear if it is appropriate to *all* ailettes.  There are no known extant ailettes.  It's one of those mystery things.  Most people seem to like the idea of making them from a thin piece of hardened leather or maybe parchment stretched over thin wood.  Some people are really attached to the idea of them being defensive.  Some evidence points to them being made of non-defensive materials.  Most of the people who say they are defensive point to the fact that they are depicted artistically in battle, but so are things like heraldic crests and surcoats, so it would appear knights were willing to wear flashy heraldic symbols that weren't directly for defense.  It is a mystery ;)
It's interesting that they are mentioned in the late 12th century. Since they are generally depicted in late 13th century and earl 14th century art. Did you mean to type late 13th? if not that would be interesting(now I'm going a bit more off topic) because There is a quote by Gerald of wales where he mentions in rarity that some knights would wear Iron greaves. Another Item that is usually  mid to late 13th century and still rare and it is being mentioned in the late 12th.
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Sir Edward on 2015-10-30, 14:11:50

Yeah, I knew there weren't any extant, surviving examples. I'd only heard about leather, or leather wrapped wood being the strongest theories, but parchment. Wow.  ;) It makes sense if it's only meant to add a splash of detail.
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Ian on 2015-10-30, 15:50:04
It's interesting that they are mentioned in the late 12th century. Since they are generally depicted in late 13th century and earl 14th century art. Did you mean to type late 13th? if not that would be interesting(now I'm going a bit more off topic) because There is a quote by Gerald of wales where he mentions in rarity that some knights would wear Iron greaves. Another Item that is usually  mid to late 13th century and still rare and it is being mentioned in the late 12th.

That was a typo, should have said late 13th century tournament.
Title: Re: PARF 2015
Post by: Naythan on 2015-11-05, 16:40:52
It's interesting that they are mentioned in the late 12th century. Since they are generally depicted in late 13th century and earl 14th century art. Did you mean to type late 13th? if not that would be interesting(now I'm going a bit more off topic) because There is a quote by Gerald of wales where he mentions in rarity that some knights would wear Iron greaves. Another Item that is usually  mid to late 13th century and still rare and it is being mentioned in the late 12th.

That was a typo, should have said late 13th century tournament.
There go my dreams of being to re-enact a late 13th century knight for late 12th century ;)